In the News

Corporate Caring Profile

Our “Corporate Caring” series seeks to share United Way of Greater Cleveland’s partners who hold workplace campaigns, special events, volunteers programs and more that work to make our community a greater place to live, work and play. We want to highlight the great works and charitable giving so many businesses strive to achieve in our great community!

Questions and Answers

Why is partnering with United Way of Greater Cleveland so important to the NRP Group?
One of the things that we do as a company is we build housing for those less fortunate than us. Part of our core values is really understanding that there are less fortunate in our society. I can think of no other group in Cleveland that really helps on a grand scale the people in our society that are left behind like the United Way. The employees at the NRP Group really understand that.
How have you reached 100 percent employee participation for your workplace campaign and for so long?
We’ve had that [100 percent participation] for over 12 years now, and I think one of the ways we’re able to achieve that is that the pressure has been taken out. We really explain to the employees, we take the time to work with them, bring in great speakers from the United Way and some of the agencies that are recipients, and we share the message with them. Because we have a compassionate and understanding organization of people that get it. We’re just asking them to participate. And once they participate, they begin to increase their gift year-after-year. I think it’s that increase that we’re most proud of in addition to the 100 percent giving.
What was your first experience with volunteerism and philanthropy?
I grew up in a family with a tradition of giving. I’ve been very involved in the Jewish community in Cleveland and from a very young age have been taught to give back and that there are people less fortunate than us. I’ve made it part of my life. I’ve made it part of my business. And it’s something that I’m very proud of personally. I’m proud to pass that tradition on to my children and proud to share it with my fellow coworkers.
What is a cause or issue that you feel is important to you personally?
I really believe that financial stability and financial education is something that’s very important. I’m very proud United Way is a part of that, because one of the things dealing in low-income housing for our residents, in our communities, is we realize that there is real financial illiteracy within the communities.

If people could start talking about what it means to have financial independence at a younger age, they can start to strive for that. That is something that I think is really important that United Way does that not a lot of people know about. But, here at NRP we understand that.

Why would you encourage other business leaders to partner with United Way?
My message to other small-business owners in the Cleveland area is to take that leadership; to give yourself, and to open up that giving to the rest of your employees. As a leader, I feel it’s incumbent upon me to share that message with my employees.

Because the reality is, we’re all recipients of United Way when you think about it. If we have a stronger society, we’re going to have stronger businesses; we’re going to have stronger family lives; we’re going to have less crime; we’re going to have a better society that we live in.

We’re going to be defined as a city by how we take care of the least well-off in our community. There’s no better intermediary than the United Way that understands the agencies, understands where the dollars are going, and has critical oversight. I think they do a fantastic job.

J. David Heller
Principal of the NRP Group
J. David Heller from the NRP Group - Corporate Caring
Cleveland Number of Employees (Cleveland Office): 119

Workplace Campaign Employee Participation: 100 percent for the past 12 years

United Way Young Leaders learn about a career of change, diversity, inclusiveness

United Way Yoong Leaders Group at GE Lighting-2

On October 25, more than 30 young professionals gathered at GE Lighting headquarters in Nela Park in East Cleveland to attend the United Way Young Leaders’ speaker series.

This installment featured Bill Lacey, president and CEO of GE Lighting. Bill, a 25-year veteran of GE, has lived in numerous cities other than Cleveland and started the talk by sharing that Cleveland is one of his favorite places.

“Cleveland has reinvented itself in a way that has to be noted,” he mentioned.

When change happens

It’s no secret that GE has gone through its own restructuring throughout the years. Bill mentioned that during his time at GE there were many tough conversations and hard decisions that needed to occur to enact change. He clearly stated that to create change in a workforce that transparency is key.

His strategy during organizational change was to keep innovation teams separate from those not involved in organizational change; waiting until there was “proof that the change was needed” before combining the teams together.

Standing out, making connections

Perhaps the best part of the whole talk was Bill acknowledging that while he was coming up in finance he didn’t always look like all the others in the room from a racial perspective. When he was asked by the group how he navigated that challenge, he mentioned that people are more alike than not, and they can look beyond superficial differences when they work together and get to know each other.

“It’s incumbent to realize that some people are uncomfortable, so I had to put myself in front of them, ignore it to some degree, and get done what needed to get done.” He also acknowledged that people sometimes feel uncomfortable stepping outside of their comfort zones, mentioning he often put himself front and center so that people would interact with him and get to know him.

During the Q&A session, Bill was asked about maintaining a positive work-life balance. He noted that there is a sacrifice, but “when you’re home, you’re home” and sometimes you need to draw a line in the sand even if it means taking a career hit.

He concluded the session encouraging those in attendance to give back to the community by finding where your passions are and finding a place to “enhance that passion.”


Watch the entire speaker series event with Bill Lacey from GE Lighting below.

 

Learn more about the Young Leaders
 

WHO IS ALICE? ANOTHER LOOK AT POVERTY

United Way ALICEWe all know ALICE. They’re the hard-working people who make us feel at home in our communities. They’re the cashier at your grocery store; the waitress at your favorite restaurant; the teller at your local bank; the teacher at your child’s daycare; and the single mom working two part-time jobs.

The newly released ALICE report by Ohio United Way paints a detailed picture of financial instability in each Ohio county. ALICE – Asset-Limited, Income-Constrained, Employed – represents 27 percent of the households in Ohio that bring home a paycheck that is insufficient to cover the basic necessities of housing, food, child care, healthcare, and transportation.  When combined with the number of households living under the federal poverty level, the total percentage of Ohio families struggling to afford basic needs rises to 40 percent.

The voices of ALICE

United Way Greater Cleveland hears the voice of ALICE from 26 counties across the state, 24 hours per day/ 7 days a week, when they call our 2-1-1 Helpline seeking assistance for issues such as food, rent, utilities or medication. They tell us about the challenges they face and they ask for help.  We tell them about the government and nonprofits programs that offer solutions and opportunity.  We make the important and meaningful connections between people and services that can change a person’s life for the better.

Who needs to listen?

As government struggles with their own financial stability challenges at the local, state and federal level, we hope they will listen closely to the voices of ALICE.

United Way of Greater Cleveland, with community partners, strives to raise up the voices of ALICE and those living in poverty to our elected officials and regulatory administrators.  We want to help them consider the impact of their decisions on our most vulnerable families.  If income or sales tax is raised, how will it affect those who are barely making ends meet? If funding for food and utility assistance is cut, will children go to bed cold and hungry? If payday lending is reformed, will it change the financial trajectory of ALICE households?  If the Earned Income Tax Credit is expanded how will it impact those walking on a financial tightrope?

What are we doing to impact ALICE?

In Cuyahoga, Medina and Geauga counties – United Way of Greater Cleveland’s three-county footprint – we are working with Fortune 500 companies, small businesses, committed community volunteers and dedicated staff to fight poverty and create financial stability in our community.

We will use the ALICE report to:

  • Remove stigmas/stereotypes associated with the “working poor,” who are struggling, hard-working taxpayers who deserve help
  • Protect the safety net and advocate for strategies to help a family cope with an emergency and prevent a spiral into poverty
  • Advocate for long-term strategies to help families achieve and maintain financial stability

This isn’t just a household problem; it’s a community problem.  How can Ohio thrive when over one-third of our state lives below the federal poverty level and/or don’t earn enough to make a bare-minimum household “survival budget?”

What can you do with us?

It is incumbent upon all of us to help ALICE families avoid being one crisis away from spiraling into poverty.

Stability in the lives of ALICE is positive for companies that employ them and helps stabilize the economic fabric of our community. Lawmakers, schools, businesses and social service agencies all need to come together to raise awareness, remove barriers and create long-term solutions.

That’s what democracy is all about –  citizens, businesses and government coming together in a non-partisan manner to resolve community problems. We hope you will join the movement and help our ALICE individuals and families prosper by visiting www.unitedwaycleveland.org/ALICE.

To learn more about what United Way of Greater Cleveland is doing to address poverty in northeast Ohio, sign up to receive our community newsletter.


 

When growing up in poverty, it can be hard to see a way out

A Greater Cleveland Cleveland.com Poverty SeriesCleveland.com recently began a new series called “A Greater Cleveland,” highlighting the issue of generational poverty. The first article focused on children living in King Kennedy, a public housing complex on Cleveland’s east side. Kids growing up in poverty, like the kids in these articles, may not have access to healthy food, safe places to play, or high-quality educational opportunities. They may also face violence; sometimes on the streets and sometimes in their own homes.

More than 50 percent of kids in Cleveland live in poverty. This is an incredible statistic and is central to why Cleveland.com is telling stories about this complex issue — an issue that must be approached from many angles.

Mentoring through poverty

Often children growing up in poverty don’t have the benefit of a positive role model. One of the many factors that can influence a young person’s aspirations and outcomes, therefore, is whether or not they have a mentor. Mentors can provide a caring adult for kids to talk with, sharing insights, advice and experiences that are invaluable. Mentors can provide exposure to activities that a kid would normally not have access to and provide a view into various career paths.

In fact, a 2014 report from MENTOR: The National Mentoring Partnership, reveals that at-risk youth with mentors are more likely to engage in positive activities, including volunteering, participating in school sports or clubs, and holding leadership positions in extracurricular activities. It was also reported that “more than three quarters (76 percent) of at-risk young adults who had a mentor aspire to enroll in and graduate from college versus half (56 percent) of at-risk young adults who had no mentor.”

Revealing needs in Greater Cleveland

United Way’s recently completed Community Assessment identified quality “out-of-school time” activities as a critical need for Greater Cleveland’s children. Mentoring is a proven best practice that can lead to social-emotional growth, improved academic performance and better school attendance. Not only does United Way support mentoring programs through its funding, the Young Leaders also volunteer with Boys and Girls Clubs at the very same King Kennedy housing complex featured on Cleveland.com.

Visit http://www.cleveland.com/a-greater-cleveland/ to read the stories and experience how poverty truly affects so many people in our region.


 

Please support United Way today
 

Several Cleveland schools receive national recognition for being healthy

By Zerrine K. Bailey, Healthy Schools program manager, Cleveland Metropolitan School District
In early August, the Alliance for a Healthier Generation launched the America’s Healthiest Schools campaign, recognizing 323 schools across the country that are creating healthier learning environments where children can thrive. As a Healthy Schools Program Manager, I work with 78 Cleveland schools to create sustainable, healthy change for students and staff.

All of America’s Healthiest Schools received National Healthy Schools Awards – a prestigious achievement that celebrates schools that meet or exceed stringent standards for serving healthier meals and snacks, getting students moving more, offering high-quality physical and health education and empowering school leaders to become healthy role models.

This year, six Cleveland schools received national recognition for their transformative health and wellness efforts:

  • Andrew J. Rickoff
  • Artemus Ward
  • Fullerton
  • Ginn Academy
  • Miles Park
  • Robert H. Jamison

These schools are leaders in the Cleveland Community and in the nationwide movement to create healthier schools for kids. They became America’s Healthiest Schools by going the extra mile. They encouraged their scholars to:

  • Get up and move by taking brain breaks during the school day;
  • To find time in the week to provide students with a minimum of 60 minutes of physical education time (national recommendation);
  • To consume healthier food and beverage snack options during the day;
  • To support staff and families in becoming healthier, so they could serve as role models for our young people;
  • … and so much more.

Ms. Sharra Wimberly, Fullerton wraparound coordinator, noted:

Cleveland Schools - Fullerton BannerThe primary business of any school is education. However, research shows that students learn best when they are healthy, safe and feel connected to their school. An investment in a healthy school community is an investment in student success. Here at Fullerton we felt it was important to take a holistic approach to our scholars well-being, so we focused on physical health, mental health along with academics and behaviors. The goal was to promote health and well-being for all members of the school community [scholars, staff and community].”

Every school is capable of becoming one of America’s Healthiest Schools. It starts with each of us committing to support our schools (even in small ways) to reach this goal. Studies show that healthy students learn better. They perform better on tests, get better grades, attend school more often and behave better in class. This speaks to the primary business of schools.

If we start today, we can inspire the next generation of healthier young people. To learn more about creating healthier schools in our community, visit the Alliance for a Healthier Generation website.

 


Zerrine K. Bailey serves as the Healthy Schools Program Manager for Cleveland Metropolitan School District.  She is funded through a generous grant from the United Way of Greater Cleveland, St. Luke’s Foundation, and Mt. Sinai HealthCare Foundation to work with 78 schools within Cleveland Metropolitan School District to create sustainable healthy changes for students and staff.

 

Planting the seeds of literacy throughout Greater Cleveland

By Seeds of Literacy Executive Director, Bonnie Entler
Seeds of Literacy is a nationally accredited non-profit organization that provides free basic education and GED® preparation to adults in the Cleveland area. Seeds believes that the root cause of poverty is illiteracy and that working together with students, volunteers, donors and more, we can put an end to this cycle. Led by more than 200 volunteer tutors, and overseen by professional educators, Seeds’ offers a personalized one-on-one model of learning, with flexible class times.

The Seeds’ program empowers adults to succeed by fighting the root cause of poverty: illiteracy. Studies show that an average of 66 percent of Clevelanders are functionally illiterate, with some neighborhoods as high as 85 percent. Functional illiteracy means they may have trouble understanding bus schedules, utility bills, or doctor’s instructions, and are unable to help their children with homework – all skills necessary for running a household.

“66 percent of Cleveland Adults are functionally illiterate”

The causes for illiteracy vary by individual, so in addition to educational instruction, Seeds’ instructors offer care and genuine concern for the welfare of students. This dynamic combination can be life changing – a powerful first step towards economic self-sufficiency, better health and the academic success of a student’s entire family.

We hold new student orientation every week and we’re open year-round so students can learn at their own pace and around their busy schedules.  Students set their individual educational goals in orientation, so rather than a one-size-fits-all curricula, instruction is completely customized for each individual. Students have the ability to attend any  – or all – of the classes that are offered three times a day, four days a week. We have both East and West side locations, conveniently located along major bus routes.

Find out how you can get involved with Seeds. Call us at 216.661.7950 or visit us at www.seedsofliteracy.org.

Check out the video below to get a glimpse into what we do here at Seeds of Literacy!

Join us for an evening of fun, philanthropy and food!

Augie NapoliIt’s that time of year when our children head back to school, the days become shorter and we start looking forward to all that fall has to offer our beautiful midwestern city. It’s also the time of year when we hold our annual campaign kickoff. This will be the second official campaign kickoff under my tenure; and as we have done with many other aspects of our organization during the past year, we’ve decided to transform the event to better reengage the community.

This year we’re changing it up from pancakes and taking a more progressive approach to celebrating our kickoff. As someone who holds Cleveland near and dear to my heart, I wanted to help showcase our great city in a less traditional way, while still convening our community members, donors and volunteers in our city’s epicenter to say thank you for your generosity, passion and dedication. After all, you are at the heart – the philanthropic pulse – of what makes United Way tick.

We want to celebrate the things we all love most about Cleveland – our community, our innovation, our willingness to change and the people who make Cleveland a city of greatness and goodwill!

As part of our new United Way, driven by our new strategic plan, we have shifted focus to two core priorities – the people we serve and the donors who make it possible to do so. This year’s event will be held at a fantastic location where Clevelanders can come together to celebrate this past campaign year, while enjoying the city and all that inspires them to give of their time, talent and treasure. What better place than Mall B in downtown where we have celebrated historic sporting wins and are surrounded by the sights and sounds of a respected and growing city?

This year our “Heroes in the CLE” event will honor those in our community who have not only supported United Way and our partner agencies, but have also inspired us to continue to focus on the bigger picture: helping improve the lives of our children, neighbors and community members to ensure that everyone has a healthier, safer and brighter future.

Please join our team, our Campaign Co-Chairs Beth Mooney, CEO of KeyCorp; and Chris Kelly, partner at Jones Day; and fellow community members on Mall B in downtown Cleveland on Thursday, August 31 from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. Mingle with fellow Clevelanders while enjoying food from local food trucks and music from DJ Ryan Wolf, helping kickoff this year’s campaign by reaffirming your promise to be a Hero in the CLE for those in need.

Lutheran Metropolitan Ministry advocates for those without a voice

By President & CEO, Andrew Genszler, Lutheran Metropolitan Ministry

Andrew Genszler - Lutheran Metropolitan MinistryLutheran Metropolitan Ministry (LMM) inhabits the intersection where great needs meet bold solutions. Our mission leads us to operate programs that change lives, transform communities and enliven community engagement.

Since 1969, Lutheran Metropolitan Ministry (LMM) has focused on serving people who are oppressed, forgotten and hurting, including individuals who are homeless, unemployed and involved in the criminal justice system, as well as individuals with behavioral health, guardianship and life-skill needs. Through advocacy and civic engagement, LMM prioritizes public policy issues reflective of our program interests and in line with the interests of our community, stakeholders, clients, program participants and staff.

In 2016, LMM served 8,272 people and engaged 3,584 volunteers. Last year alone: 409,866 meals were prepared for people who are homeless; 3,697 homeless adults and youth received shelter; 608 hours of behavioral health counseling were completed; 1,601 people obtained stable housing; 842 adults accessed medical care; and there were 281 job placements.

LMM is bolstered by individual donors, foundations, government agencies, community partners and more than 3,000 volunteers. We are particularity grateful to United Way of Greater Cleveland for its support of our work in Needs Based Housing Supports, Job Placement and Retention, Chronic Disease Management and Transportation.

Watch the video below to get a glimpse of what Lutheran Metropolitan Ministry does:

United Way Services of Geauga County awarded for distinguished service

By Kimm Leininger, executive director, United Way Services of Geauga County

Kimm and Monica with john and tracy - Frank Samuel Distinguished Service Award by the Geauga Growth Partnership (GGP) United Way Services of Geauga County was presented with the Frank Samuel Distinguished Service Award by the Geauga Growth Partnership (GGP) on June 21.  This award recognizes the:

“prolonged service and outstanding achievement by a GGP member or organization, who through relentless determination, diligence and dedication, has made significant contributions to enhance the value, quality, effectiveness and stature of the GGP and embodies…community service, economic development, advocacy, leadership, community impact, generosity and transparency, and a strong business acumen with a collaborative leadership style.” 

We were very humbled to receive this honor; and we know that getting this award is a true reflection of the value of doing excellent work in this great community.

Geauga County is blessed with organizations and community leaders who are interested in joining together to work on issues and develop local solutions that can lead to long-term positive change.  United Way has been able to bring key stakeholders to the table to address community issues, and participate in the planning processes with several others as well.  We have seen some of the greatest changes happen over the last few years, as we have come together to work on addressing income issues.

Fortunately, we learned long ago that when we stop and listen to the needs of those in our community, the doors of opportunity and possibility open widely. Over the last few years, individuals from our community have discussed ways to strengthen Geauga County. We repeatedly heard about the need to help individuals find employment that will enable them to care for themselves or their family; support those who may be underemployed rise to their full potential and help those with disabilities to achieve maximum independence.

We have made great strides in these areas, along with our valuable partners, through the development of new and innovative programs, such as Bridges@Work and Bridges2Work.

Bridges@Work

Bridges@Work is a collaborative program with the GGP, Catholic Charities Community Services, Geauga Credit Union and the Lake-Geauga Fund of the Cleveland Foundation, which helps individuals employed within Geauga County get to work, stay focused at work and advance in the workplace.

This happens through the utilization of a social worker from Catholic Charities, who is onsite at partnering companies and works with individuals to remove barriers that inhibit their success. In addition, emergency short-term loans are available to these employees, which are a tremendous resource to the program. Connecting individuals to resources within the community has proven to be very impactful – both at the employee and employer levels.

Bridges2Work

Bridges2Work, also a collaborative program, is helping individuals who are unemployed or underemployed to expand their skill sets and gain meaningful employment along a career pathway towards success.

This has included partners from GGP, Geauga County Job and Family Services, Ohio Means Jobs, Kent State – Geauga Campus, Geauga County Department on Aging and Geauga Metropolitan Housing.  This group of partners has successfully graduated two State Tested Nursing Assistant classes from Kent State – Geauga and is branching out to new career pathways, including work in the jail with individuals soon to be released.

While United Way Services of Geauga County was the official recipient of the Frank Samuel Distinguished Service Award, we owe a debt of gratitude to the partners who show up when called upon and commit to creating change for our community.

A volunteer day of action at King Kennedy Boys and Girls Club

By Maria Oldenburg, United Way of Greater Cleveland, Intern, Affinity and Association Campaigns

Maria Oldenberg at King KennedyWith two younger sisters, it’s pretty hard not to love kids. So I was super excited to spend time playing with children at the King Kennedy Boys and Girls Club on East 59th Street with volunteers from the Young Leaders group on July 11. Armed with bags of balls, hula hoops, chalk, bubbles and racquetball games, we spent almost two hours reliving our childhoods playing with the kids.

We were surrounded by these little kids as soon as we brought out all of our toys. The reason? Well, it’s because the kids didn’t necessarily get to play with toys, like the ones we brought, at home or the Club. They were also quite excited about their new playmates; and their enthusiasm was so contagious!

They made the time fly by so quick. All of the kids that I had the chance to interact with were incredibly sweet and inviting,  showing me their best tricks and giving me advice on how to get better at the hula hoop — even though I haven’t played in years. By the end of the event, I felt like a hula hoop pro!

I also got to spend a lot of time playing tag, chalking and tossing a Frisbee with them. In addition to playing games, we had the chance to listen to the kids’ stories and support them in any way we could. It was wonderful hearing the kids tell us their plans for the future. One of the boys, who was especially good at hula hooping, wanted to be a photographer and we were able to give him, as well as the rest of the group advice. It was a really positive, humbling experience to say the least.

The Young Leaders visit the King Kennedy club once-a-month in order to share their time with the children. You can find out more information and sign up for the next Day of Action here.

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